Fun,Friends, games,trivia, recipes, discussions, news, links, forwards, jokes, and more!
 
HomeHome  RegisterRegister  Log in  TRIVIA  
ENJOY SUMMER

Share | 
 

 Obituary

View previous topic View next topic Go down 
Go to page : 1, 2, 3  Next
AuthorMessage
Carlszone

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 174
Location : Norfolk Va
Registration date : 2013-10-22

PostSubject: Obituary   Wed Nov 20, 2013 8:53 am

No news is complete w/out a place to honor those worthies that have passed on before us...

Back to top Go down
Carlszone

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 174
Location : Norfolk Va
Registration date : 2013-10-22

PostSubject: Frederick Sanger, Nobel Winner and Genome Pioneer, Dies   Wed Nov 20, 2013 8:58 am

USA Today: Frederick Sanger, Nobel Winner and Genome Pioneer, Dies

Cassandra Vinograd, Associated Press 9:31 a.m. EST November 20, 2013

Sanger first won the Nobel Prize in 1958 for his work determining the sequence of the amino acids
He won a second Nobel for development of a technique to sequence human DNA
Director of the Wellcome Trust, called Sanger "the father of the genomic era"

LONDON (AP) — British biochemist Frederick Sanger, who twice won the Nobel Prize in chemistry and was a pioneer of genome sequencing, has died at the age of 95.

His death was confirmed Wednesday by the MRC Laboratory of Molecular Biology — which Sanger helped found in 1962.

The laboratory praised Sanger, who died in his sleep Tuesday at Addenbrooke's Hospital in Cambridge, as an "extremely modest and self-effacing man whose contributions have made an extraordinary impact on molecular biology."

Sanger was one of just four individuals to have been awarded two Nobel Prizes; the others being Marie Curie, Linus Pauling and John Bardeen.

Jeremy Farrar, director of the Wellcome Trust, called Sanger "the father of the genomic era."

Sanger first won the Nobel Prize in 1958 at the age of 40 for his work on the structure of proteins. He had determined the sequence of the amino acids in insulin and showed how they are linked together.

He later turned his attention to the sequencing of nucleic acids and developing techniques to determine the exact sequence of the building blocks in DNA.

That work led to Sanger's second Nobel Prize, awarded jointly in 1980 with Stanford University's Paul Berg and Harvard University's Walter Gilbert, for their work determining base sequences in nucleic acids.

Venki Ramakrishnan, deputy director of the MRC Laboratory, said it would be "impossible to overestimate the impact" Sanger had on modern genetics and molecular biology.

Sanger was born on Aug. 13, 1918, in Gloucestershire, southwestern England. While he initially planned to study medicine like his father, he switched fields and earned a degree in natural sciences from Cambridge University 1939. A conscientious objector in World War II, he went on to earn a PhD working on protein metabolism from the same university.

In addition to the Nobel Prizes, Sanger was made a fellow of the Royal Society in 1954, Commander of the Order of the British Empire in 1963 and the Order of Merit in 1986.

Sanger declined a knighthood, however, because he preferred not to be called "sir," according to the laboratory he helped found.

According to The Sanger Institute, when he was asked if he would mind an institute being named after him, Sanger agreed — but said "It had better be good."

Sanger is survived by three children — Robin, Peter and Sally.

Copyright 2013 The Associated Press. All rights reserved.
Back to top Go down
David F

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 162
Age : 66
Location : Florida
Registration date : 2013-10-19

PostSubject: Re: Obituary   Wed Nov 20, 2013 11:47 am

RIP Sanger
Back to top Go down
Carlszone

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 174
Location : Norfolk Va
Registration date : 2013-10-22

PostSubject: Psychic Sylvia Browne Dies in San Jose at 77   Thu Nov 21, 2013 12:48 am

Mercury News: Psychic Sylvia Browne Dies in San Jose at 77

By Dana Hull
dhull@mercurynews.com
POSTED:   11/20/2013 07:07:47 PM PST | UPDATED:   ABOUT 5 HOURS AGO

SAN JOSE -- Sylvia Celeste Browne, a well-known psychic and author, died Wednesday at Good Samaritan Hospital in San Jose at the age of 77, according to an announcement on her website.

Browne often assisted in missing persons cases, regularly appeared on television and was a frequent guest on "The Montel Williams Show." She and her son, Chris Dufrense, offered personal psychic readings from their office in Campbell.

Browne was born in 1936 in Kansas City, Missouri, where "her spiritual psychic ability began to manifest at the age of three," according to an obituary posted on Browne's website and Facebook page. "For many years she shared her gift with friends and family, gaining a reputation for accuracy with her trademark down-to-earth approach and sense of humor."

READ AND SIGN

Guest book in memory of Sylvia Browne

Browne moved to California in 1964. A decade later, she founded The Nirvana Foundation for Psychic Research. Browne was a strong believer in reincarnation and wrote several books that appeared on the New York Times Bestsellers List, including "Life on the Other Side," which was written with Lindsay Harrison.

In 2003, Browne appeared on "Montel" and spoke about Nancy MacDuckston, a Belmont teacher who has been missing since Aug. 11, 2003. Browne said that MacDuckston was alive and had joined a cult. There's no evidence that a cult was involved in her disappearance.

Browne also came under criticism for telling the mother of Ohio kidnapping victim Amanda Berry that her daughter was dead. Berry and two other women were found alive in May after being held captive for years by the same man.

Browne is survived by her husband, Michael Ulery, sons Christopher and Paul Dufresne, three grandchildren, Angelia, Jeffrey, and William; and her sister Sharon Bortolussi, according to her Website. A private memorial service is to be scheduled.
Back to top Go down
David F

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 162
Age : 66
Location : Florida
Registration date : 2013-10-19

PostSubject: Re: Obituary   Thu Nov 21, 2013 2:53 pm

Sylvia Brown, world famous Psychic, dead at 77. Who would of guessed?

RIP Sylvia.

Browne most recently took heat after famously announcing that Amanda Berry had died after she went missing in 2003 ... because, as we all know now, she wasn't dead. Sylvia chalked up the misinformation as a simple mistake.

Read more: http://www.tmz.com/2013/11/20/sylvia-browne-world-famous-psychic-dead/#ixzz2lJotieFc
Back to top Go down
Carlszone

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 174
Location : Norfolk Va
Registration date : 2013-10-22

PostSubject: 'Fast and Furious' Star Paul Walker Dies In Car Crash   Sun Dec 01, 2013 8:55 am

Chicago Tribrune: 'Fast and Furious' Star Paul Walker Dies In Car Crash

Tribune staff and wire reports
8:19 a.m. CST, December 1, 2013

Actor Paul Walker, best known for his roles in the "Fast and the Furious" action movies, died on Saturday in a car crash in Southern California, his publicist said.

Walker, 40, who was in five of the six films about illegal street racing and heists, was a passenger in a friend's car and was attending a charity event, according to a message linked to his Twitter account.

"Sadly, I must confirm that Paul did pass away this afternoon in a car accident," Ame Van Iden, Walker's publicist, said in an email.

RELATED

Obituary: Sign Paul Waker's guest book

The Los Angeles County Sheriff's Department said in a statement that two people were killed in a car accident in Valencia, a community in the city of Santa Clarita, at about 5:30 p.m. CT.

Deputies arriving at the scene found the vehicle engulfed in flames. The victims were pronounced dead at the scene, the statement said. The office did not provide the identities of the dead, and said the cause was under investigation.

In the "Fast and Furious" pictures, the blond-haired, blue-eyed actor played Brian O'Conner, a law enforcement official.

The first movie in the series, which stars Vin Diesel, was released in 2001, and a seventh was in development at the time of his death, Universal, the studio behind the franchise, said in a statement. The most recent film, released in May, was one of this year's biggest box office hits.

"Brother I will miss you very much," Diesel said in a post on Instagram, adding "I am absolutely speechless. Heaven has gained a new Angel. Rest in Peace."

According to the IMDb.com movie website, Paul William Walker IV was born in Glendale, California, in 1973 and began acting at a very young age, appearing in many commercials.

He played Professor Bennet in the 1987 movie "Monster in the Closet" and starred in the television series "Throb," IMDb said.

Walker also made guest appearances on television shows, including "Charles in Charge" and "Who's the Boss?" and had a role in the soap opera, "The Young and the Restless."

Other film appearances include "Timeline," "Into the Blue," "The Lazarus Project" and "Hours," which is slated for release in December.

According to IMDb, Walker has a daughter named Meadow.

Universal conveyed its condolences to Walker's family, saying, "All of us at Universal are heartbroken.

"Paul was truly one of the most beloved and respected members of our studio family for 14 years, and this loss is devastating to us, to everyone involved with the Fast and Furious films, and to countless fans."

More tributes flowed on social media websites such as Twitter, Facebook and Instagram.

"So sad. He gave a lot of joy," wrote James Franco, while model/actor Tyson Beckford posted "Tyson Beckford: RIP Paul Walker, loved working with you on "Into the Blue."

Television host Carson Daly said that he was "Sick about the tragic loss of #PaulWalker. I enjoyed our time together very much. Such a really nice guy," while actress Alyssa Milano, current host of "Project Runway All Stars," protested "No. No. No" before adding "Rest with the angels."

Carla Rivera of the Los Angeles Times contributed.

Copyright © 2013, Los Angeles Times
Back to top Go down
David F

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 162
Age : 66
Location : Florida
Registration date : 2013-10-19

PostSubject: Re: Obituary   Sun Dec 01, 2013 1:02 pm

It's sad and he was just a passenger.
Back to top Go down
Carlszone

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 174
Location : Norfolk Va
Registration date : 2013-10-22

PostSubject: Nelson Mandela 1918 - 2013   Fri Dec 06, 2013 1:49 pm

New York Times: Mandela’s Death Stirs Sense of Loss Around the World

The New York Times
December 6, 2013
By LYDIA POLGREEN and ALAN COWELL
 
JOHANNESBURG — When Cliff Rosen awoke on Friday to the news that Nelson Mandela had died, he went out to the sunflowers growing in his garden and cut down the tallest one.

“A special flower for a special man,” said Mr. Rosen, a 40-year-old urban farmer, as he wired the towering, six-foot stalk to the fence surrounding the spontaneous memorial that has sprung up just outside the home where Mr. Mandela died Thursday night. “I chose this flower because he towered over us all,” Mr. Rosen said. “Today it feels like the world got a little bit smaller.”

In the government’s first announcement of a schedule for ceremonies that are likely to draw vast numbers of world dignitaries and less exalted mourners, President Jacob Zuma said on Friday that the former president’s body would lie in state from Dec. 11 to 13 after a memorial at a huge World Cup soccer stadium in Soweto on Dec. 10. He will be buried in his childhood village, Qunu, in the Eastern Cape region, on Dec. 15 after a state funeral, Mr. Zuma said.

The White House said in a statement that President Obama and first lady Michelle Obama would visit South Africa next week “to participate in memorial events.” The wording left unclear whether the state funeral was included.

The state funeral will fall on the eve of Dec. 16, one of the most important public holidays in the South African political calendar with heavy historical resonance for blacks and whites. Officially known since 1994 as the Day of Reconciliation, it also marks the founding in 1961 of the Umkhonto we Sizwe, or Spear of the Nation, guerrilla army that opposed white rule, and a much earlier victory by Afrikaner forces over a Zulu army in 1838 known as the Battle of Blood River.

At a service in Cape Town, Archbishop Desmond Tutu, himself a towering figure in the struggle against apartheid that defined much of Mr. Mandela’s life, expressed the hopes and fears of many of his compatriots when he told congregants at St. George’s Anglican Cathedral early on Friday: “Let us give him the gift of a South Africa united, one.”

As flags flew at half-staff across South Africa, a sense of loss, blended with memories of inspiration, spread from President Obama in Washington to members of the British royal family and on to those who saw Mr. Mandela as an exemplar of a broader struggle.

“A giant among men has passed away,” Prime Minister Manmohan Singh of India said. “This is as much India’s loss as South Africa’s.”

As public figures competed for superlatives to describe Mr. Mandela, Prime Minister David Cameron declared in London: “A great light has gone out in the world.” Pope Francis praised “the steadfast commitment shown by Nelson Mandela in promoting the human dignity of all the nation’s citizens and in forging a new South Africa.” President Vladimir V. Putin of Russia said Mr. Mandela was “committed to the end of his days to the ideals of humanism and justice.”

Speaking in Cape Town after his service in the cathedral, Archbishop Tutu asked rhetorically whether Mr. Mandela was “the exception to prove the rule.”

“I say no, emphatically,” he said, adding that Mr. Mandela “embodied our hopes and dreams, symbolized our enormous potential.”

Helen Zille, the leader of the opposition Democratic Alliance, said that South Africans owed their sense of belonging to a single family to Mr. Mandela. “That is his legacy,” she said. “It is why there is an unparalleled outpouring of national grief at his passing.”

The tone of the tributes reflected seemingly universal sentiments crossing racial, national, religious and political lines. In the United States, Republicans and Democrats alike rushed to embrace his legacy. In China, the government hailed him as a liberator from imperialism, even as dissidents embraced him as a symbol of resistance against repression.

In Syria, President Bashar al-Assad, accused by the political opposition of heinous crimes in a nearly three-year-old civil war, said Mr. Mandela was “an inspiration in the values of love and human brotherhood.”

In South Africa, people of all races gathered at Mr. Mandela’s home, laying wreaths, singing freedom songs, whispering prayers and performing the shuffling toyi-toyi dance in his honor. People came together in a way that seems increasingly rare in a nation confronting the everyday worries of a struggling economy, incessant allegations of government corruption and a sinking sense that a nation born two decades ago into such promise is slipping into despair.

“It is one of those days when everyone is united again,” said Reginald Hoskins, who brought his two young children to Mr. Mandela’s house on Friday morning. “That is what Nelson Mandela stood for, and we need to honor that in our lives every day.”

For those who knew him best, the knowledge that he has gone slowly seeped in.

“I never thought, knowing him for close to 40 years, that I would ever speak of him in the past tense,” said Tokyo Sexwale, a senior member of the African National Congress who served prison time on Robben Island alongside Mr. Mandela. “The passing of an icon like Nelson Mandela signifies the end of an era.”

Britons often claim a particular bond among the many Europeans who supported South Africa’s struggle against apartheid, leading efforts to impose an international boycott on South African sports figures and gathering frequently to protest outside the country’s high commission, or embassy, in Trafalgar Square in London. A line formed outside the building on Friday as scores of people waited to sign a condolence book.

But it was a sometimes ambivalent relationship, with former Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher displaying an abiding suspicion of Mr. Mandela’s role as a leader in the violent struggle to overthrow white rule. Newer generations had a different view.

Prince William, the second in line to the British throne, spoke to reporters after attending the premiere of a movie about Mr. Mandela on Thursday, calling him “an extraordinary and inspiring man.”

The tumult of tributes to Mr. Mandela reflected both his ability after his release from prison in 1990 to reach out to people to forge bonds around the world, and the way in which many leaders and public figures sought him out.

“His passion for freedom and justice created new hope for generations of oppressed people worldwide,” said former President Jimmy Carter.

Musicians, clerics and sports figures joined the rush to offer accolades after Mr. Mandela’s death was announced late Thursday, with a leading South African cricketer, A. B. de Villiers, echoing Archbishop Tutu’s hope for a future free of renewed racial and social division.

“Let us now, more than ever, stick together as a nation,” Mr. de Villiers said. “We owe him that much.”

Mr. Mandela was closely linked with sports, both as a boxer in his youth and, after becoming South Africa’s first black president, as a supporter of the national Springbok rugby team — once a symbol of white exclusivism — which triumphed in the 1995 World Cup.

But his broader legacy, for some sports figures, related to his quest for reconciliation and freedom.

“He taught us forgiveness on a grand scale,” Muhammad Ali said in a statement. “His was a spirit born free, destined to soar above the rainbows. Today his spirit is soaring through the heavens. He is now forever free.”

Usain Bolt, the Jamaican Olympic sprinter, called Mr. Mandela “one of the greatest human beings ever.”

In the Middle East, Israeli and Palestinian leaders offered tributes to a man who had been a staunch supporter of and role model for the Palestine Liberation Organization, but who had also recognized what he called “the legitimacy of Zionism as a Jewish nationalism.”

Mr. Mandela and his African National Congress resented the close military and intelligence ties that Israel maintained over decades with South Africa’s apartheid leadership, and one of his first acts as a free man was to visit Yasir Arafat, the Palestinian leader.

On Friday, Marwan Barghouti, a Palestinian leader imprisoned since 2002, declared in a statement: “From within my prison cell, I tell you our freedom seems possible because you reached yours,” according to a translation released by the P.L.O.

Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu of Israel called Mr. Mandela “a paragon of our time” and a “moral leader of the first order,” while President Shimon Peres said his “legacy will remain etched on the pages of history and in the hearts of all those people whose lives he touched.”

Some 40 African leaders and senior officials were gathering in Paris to attend a summit meeting with President François Hollande when Mr. Mandela died. Overshadowed by the news from Johannesburg, the gathering opened on Friday with one minute’s silence for Mr. Mandela.

Lydia Polgreen reported from Johannesburg, and Alan Cowell from London. Jodi Rudoren contributed reporting from Jerusalem, Rick Gladstone from New York, and Michael D. Shear from Washington.
Back to top Go down
David F

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 162
Age : 66
Location : Florida
Registration date : 2013-10-19

PostSubject: Re: Obituary   Sun Dec 08, 2013 8:29 pm





Back to top Go down
Carlszone

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 174
Location : Norfolk Va
Registration date : 2013-10-22

PostSubject: Re: Obituary   Tue Dec 10, 2013 9:28 pm

Wow! It's hard to believe how much time has passed since his death. Here was a man who unlike most stars of his time enjoyed walking around freely w/out a horde of body guards and publicity staff.

Broke my heart...
Back to top Go down
Carlszone

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 174
Location : Norfolk Va
Registration date : 2013-10-22

PostSubject: The Legendary Irish-born Thespian Peter O'Toole Has Passed Away At The Age Of 81   Sun Dec 15, 2013 12:51 pm

MSN News: The Legendary Irish-born Thespian Peter O'Toole Has Passed Away At The Age Of 81

LONDON — Peter O'Toole, the charismatic actor who achieved instant stardom as Lawrence of Arabia and was nominated eight times for an Academy Award, has died. He was 81.

O'Toole's agent Steve Kenis says the actor died Saturday at a hospital following a long illness.

O'Toole began his acting career as one of the most exciting young talents on the British stage. His 1955 "Hamlet," at the Bristol Old Vic, was critically acclaimed.

He got his first Oscar nomination for 1962's "Lawrence of Arabia," his last for "Venus" in 2006. With that he set the record for most nominations without ever winning, though he had accepted an honorary Oscar in 2003.

A reformed — but unrepentant — hell-raiser, O'Toole long suffered from ill health. Kenis announced the death in an email Sunday.
Back to top Go down
Carlszone

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 174
Location : Norfolk Va
Registration date : 2013-10-22

PostSubject: Peter O'Toole August 2, 1932 - December 14, 2013 Guest book   Sun Dec 15, 2013 3:00 pm

Peter O'Toole August 2, 1932 - December 14, 2013 Guest book
Back to top Go down
GFyre

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 3380
Registration date : 2008-11-11

PostSubject: Re: Obituary   Sun Dec 15, 2013 3:50 pm

One of my favorite drunks, that could actually act/sing/write; I really enjoyed him in  Lawrence of Arabia plus a comedy called My Favorite Year :



Lawrence of Arabia Mirage Scene



The Impossible Dream- Man Of La Mancha



Bows Head in Silence

 :hattip: 

Back to top Go down
Carlszone

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 174
Location : Norfolk Va
Registration date : 2013-10-22

PostSubject: Joan Fontaine, Who Won an Oscar for Hitchcock’s ‘Suspicion,’ Dies at 96   Mon Dec 16, 2013 1:10 pm

New York Times: Joan Fontaine, Who Won an Oscar for Hitchcock’s ‘Suspicion,’ Dies at 96

December 15, 2013
By ANITA GATES
 
Joan Fontaine, the patrician blond actress who rose to stardom as a haunted second wife in the Alfred Hitchcock film “Rebecca” in 1940 and won an Academy Award for her portrayal of a terrified newlywed in Hitchcock’s “Suspicion,” died at her home in Carmel, Calif., on Sunday. She was 96.

Her death was confirmed by her assistant, Susan Pfeiffer.

Ms. Fontaine was only 24 when she took home her Oscar in 1942, the youngest best-actress winner at the time, but her victory was equally notable because her older sister, Olivia de Havilland, was also a nominee that year. The sisters were estranged for most of their adult lives, a situation Ms. Fontaine once attributed to her having married and won an Oscar before Ms. de Havilland did.

Until the Hitchcock films, Ms. Fontaine’s movie career had not looked promising. While Ms. de Havilland was starring opposite Errol Flynn in hits like “Captain Blood” and “The Adventures of Robin Hood” and captured the coveted role of Melanie Hamilton in “Gone With the Wind,” Ms. Fontaine struggled.

In 1937 and 1938, she made 10 mostly forgettable pictures, alternating between screwball comedies like “Maid’s Night Out,” in which she starred as a socialite mistaken for a servant, and dramas like “The Man Who Found Himself,” in which she played a noble nurse determined to save a hobo’s life.

In 1939, she appeared in two critically acclaimed pictures. She was a minor player in “Gunga Din,” with Cary Grant and Douglas Fairbanks Jr., but made an impression in the all-female ensemble cast of “The Women.” Those roles were followed by her career-making performance in “Rebecca,” which Frank S. Nugent praised in The New York Times as the film’s “real surprise” and “greatest delight.”

In the 1940s and ’50s, Ms. Fontaine — only slightly typecast as shy, aristocratic or both — had a thriving movie career, starring opposite the era’s male superstars, including Burt Lancaster, Tyrone Power and James Stewart.

She played the title character in “Jane Eyre” (1944), opposite Orson Welles; a romantic obsessive in both “The Constant Nymph” (1943), for which she received an Oscar nomination, and Max Ophüls’s “Letter From an Unknown Woman” (1948); the prim Lady Rowena in “Ivanhoe” (1952); and a British colonial in the Caribbean in the early race-relations drama “Island in the Sun” (1957). That film’s mere suggestion of an interracial romance, between Ms. Fontaine’s character and Harry Belafonte’s, was considered daring.

She made her Broadway debut in 1954, replacing Deborah Kerr as a headmaster’s sensitive wife who helps a young man affirm his sexuality in “Tea and Sympathy.” Brooks Atkinson, writing in The New York Times, preferred Ms. Kerr but called Ms. Fontaine’s performance “forceful and thoughtful” and her New York appearance “one of the better lend-lease deals with Hollywood.”

She returned to Broadway once, in the late 1960s, replacing Julie Harris in the comedy “Forty Carats,” about a middle-aged woman’s romance with a younger man.

Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland was born to British parents on Oct. 22, 1917, in Tokyo, where her father, Walter, a cousin of the aviation pioneer Sir Geoffrey de Havilland, was working as a patent lawyer. In 1919, her mother, the former Lillian Ruse, moved with her two daughters to Saratoga, Calif., near San Francisco. The de Havillands divorced, and Lillian married George M. Fontaine, a department store executive, whose surname Joan later took as her stage name.

Ms. Fontaine, who also briefly used the name Joan Burfield (inspired by a Los Angeles street sign), moved back to Japan at 15 to live with her father and to attend the American School there. Returning in 1934, she soon moved to Los Angeles to pursue a film career.

Her final big-screen roles were the heroine’s jaded older sister in “Tender Is the Night” (1962), based on the F. Scott Fitzgerald novel, and a terrified British schoolteacher in “The Devil’s Own,” a 1966 horror film.

Ms. Fontaine married and divorced four times. Her first husband was Brian Aherne, the British-born stage and film actor, whom she married in 1939 and divorced in 1945. She married William Dozier, a film producer, in 1946, and they had a daughter. After their divorce in 1951, she was married to Collier Young, a film and television writer-producer, from 1952 to 1961, and Alfred Wright Jr., a Sports Illustrated editor, from 1964 to 1969.

In 1952, she took in a 5-year-old Peruvian girl, Martita Pareja Calderon. When the girl ran away in her teens, Ms. Fontaine was unable to bring her home because she had never formally adopted the girl in the United States.

Ms. Fontaine is survived by her sister, Ms. de Havilland; a daughter, Deborah Dozier Potter of Santa Fe, N.M.; and a grandson.

She continued acting well into her 70s. She appeared in television movies, including “The Users” (1978) and “Crossings” (1986), based on a Danielle Steel novel. A series of appearances on the soap opera “Ryan’s Hope” in 1980 led to a Daytime Emmy nomination. Her final screen role was as a supportive royal grandmother in “Good King Wenceslas” (1994) on the Family Channel. She also did theater across the United States and abroad, but never returned to film.

“Looking back on Hollywood, looking at it even today,” Ms. Fontaine wrote in “No Bed of Roses” (Morrow, 1978), her autobiography, “I realize that one outstanding quality it possesses is not the lavishness, the perpetual sunshine, the golden opportunities, but fear.” Just as “careers often begin by chance there,” she observed, “they can evaporate just as quickly.”
Back to top Go down
JUST HENRY
Admin
avatar

Male
Number of posts : 2148
Age : 60
Location : Central MN
Registration date : 2008-11-07

PostSubject: Re: Obituary   Mon Dec 16, 2013 8:25 pm

per IMDB
Joan Fontaine (I) (1917–2013)
Actress
Born Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland on October 22, 1917, in Tokyo, Japan, in what was known as the International Settlement. Her father was a British patent attorney with a lucrative practice in Japan, but due to Joan and older sister Olivia de Havilland's recurring ailments the family moved to California in the hopes of improving their health. Mrs... See full bio »
Born:
Joan de Beauvoir de Havilland
October 22, 1917 in Tokyo, Japan
Died:
December 15, 2013 (age 96) Some stories can not due math said 97  in Carmel, California, USA

On her feud with sister , Fontaine once said: 'I married first, won the Oscar before Olivia did, and if I die first, she'll undoubtedly be livid'

_________________



Last edited by JUST HENRY on Mon Dec 16, 2013 10:20 pm; edited 1 time in total
Back to top Go down
Carlszone

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 174
Location : Norfolk Va
Registration date : 2013-10-22

PostSubject: Joan Fontaine 1917–2013   Mon Dec 16, 2013 8:45 pm

Joan Fontaine Guestbook
Back to top Go down
JUST HENRY
Admin
avatar

Male
Number of posts : 2148
Age : 60
Location : Central MN
Registration date : 2008-11-07

PostSubject: Re: Obituary   Mon Dec 16, 2013 9:47 pm

Noble Ray Price (January 12, 1926 – December 16, 2013)
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray_Price_%28musician%29

a towering traditional country singer who penned more than 100 hits, has died at the age of 87.

Price was diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2011 and it had recently spread to his liver, intestines and lungs, according East Texas Medical Center in Tyler. He stopped aggressive treatments and left the hospital last Thursday to receive hospice care at home.

At the time, his wife, Janie Price, relayed what she called her husband's "final message" to his fans: "I love my fans and have devoted my life to reaching out to them. I appreciate their support all these years, and I hope I haven't let them down. I am at peace. I love Jesus. I'm going to be just fine. Don't worry about me. I'll see you again one day.

_________________

Back to top Go down
Carlszone

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 174
Location : Norfolk Va
Registration date : 2013-10-22

PostSubject: Noble Ray Price January 12, 1926 – December 16, 2013   Mon Dec 16, 2013 10:37 pm

Noble Ray Price Guest Book
Back to top Go down
David F

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 162
Age : 66
Location : Florida
Registration date : 2013-10-19

PostSubject: Re: Obituary   Tue Dec 17, 2013 7:57 pm

RIP Ray



Back to top Go down
JUST HENRY
Admin
avatar

Male
Number of posts : 2148
Age : 60
Location : Central MN
Registration date : 2008-11-07

PostSubject: Al Goldstein   Fri Dec 20, 2013 2:50 pm

http://www.nytimes.com/2013/12/20/nyregion/al-goldstein-pioneering-pornographer-dies-at-77.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Al Goldstein, a Publisher Who Took the Romance Out of Sex, Dies at 77 .

_________________

Back to top Go down
Carlszone

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 174
Location : Norfolk Va
Registration date : 2013-10-22

PostSubject: Alvin "Al" Goldstein January 10, 1936 – December 19, 2013   Fri Dec 20, 2013 3:11 pm

Alvin "Al" Goldstein January 10, 1936 – December 19, 2013 Guest Book
Back to top Go down
Carlszone

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 174
Location : Norfolk Va
Registration date : 2013-10-22

PostSubject: Claire Davis   Sun Dec 22, 2013 4:24 am

Claire Davis Guest Book
Back to top Go down
David F

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 162
Age : 66
Location : Florida
Registration date : 2013-10-19

PostSubject: Re: Obituary   Sun Dec 22, 2013 3:37 pm

RIP Claire
Back to top Go down
Carlszone

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 174
Location : Norfolk Va
Registration date : 2013-10-22

PostSubject: Re: Obituary   Sun Dec 22, 2013 5:12 pm

My soul hurts, Ya know?
Back to top Go down
Carlszone

avatar

Male
Number of posts : 174
Location : Norfolk Va
Registration date : 2013-10-22

PostSubject: In Memoriam Delaney Brown   Thu Dec 26, 2013 11:55 am

Team Laney: Delaney Brown & Family Facebook page
Back to top Go down
Sponsored content




PostSubject: Re: Obituary   

Back to top Go down
 
Obituary
View previous topic View next topic Back to top 
Page 1 of 3Go to page : 1, 2, 3  Next
 Similar topics
-
» Laura Ingalls Wilder's Obituary
» Tom's Boring Requiem For Heroes: The Obituary
» Just heard that Len Castle passed away a few days ago ....
» R&R Machine in Londonderry, NH
» JOE LAPIRA PASSED AWAY.

Permissions in this forum:You cannot reply to topics in this forum
THE COMMUNITY :: General / News-
Jump to: